Page Layout and Presentation

echoesofthepen:

With so many bloggers presently taking advantage of the many new self-publishing opportunities now available, I thought it appropriate to reblog this post by another author I discovered by way of my Indie Author Review Exchange Fb group. In addition to being the author of Salby Damned, a well received thriller, Ian D. Moore is also a prolific book reviewer. This post however provides some useful and indeed essential formatting and presentation tips and information for anyone undertaking the publication of an eBook…

Ian D. Moore Author page on Facebook:

Originally posted on Ian D. Moore's Blog Page:

So, you’re thinking of writing, or you already have. Your document file is your work of art and you’re proud of it right? Have you ever thought of what it will look like say, on a kindle, or on a Kobo tablet, a Hudl perhaps. Do you think it will look the same as the file you sent over? Guess again……………….

When you send your pristine word file over to kindle, they basically meatgrind it to their formatting, what that does is take away some of the things you have specifically entered into your word file such as Italics, certain fonts, and lets say, no spacing before or after speech lines.

Now, I use word 2007 which auto saves in .docx file format, that’s fine for kindle, but for smashwords I can only save in .doc file format so I have to convert my file. I also “write to print”…

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Beyond the Pale (The Outlander) – Book Review

 

senan1It’s been a long time since I’ve read a science fiction novel, let alone one of this quality; having grown up reading the likes of Asimov’s foundation trilogy, Arthur C. Clarke’s 2001, and Frank Herbert’s Dune series, it’s not easy for a Sci-Fi book to impress me so it was with some trepidation I started on this one. I must say, this book took me completely by surprise, being very different to what I had expected but one that I nonetheless enjoyed from start to finish.

Senan Gil Senan is another author I discovered via my Indie Author Review Exchange Fb group, and his own writing has proved every bit as good and insightful as his reviews of many other authors. Further information about the author, and some fascinating background to his debut novel can be found at his blog:

https://senangilsenan.wordpress.com/

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In addition to this review, there is also a link below to the author’s recent interview by fellow blogger and book reviewer Andrew Updegrove, author of the highly acclaimed Sci-Fi thriller The Alexandria Project.

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Andrew Updegrove interviews Senan Gil Senan

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Beyond the Pale (The Outlander), by Senan Gil Senan

(Available from Amazon in eBook format)

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senan1This is a book that really hits the ground running, and in this case, quite literally. In the opening chapter we see two of the central characters, each one a valued member of their respective communities, come together when one comes to the aid of the other. The older of the two comes from a walled in society that has embraced and relies on advanced technology to enhance its citizen’s lives, yet at the same time monitoring every aspect of their existence, whilst the other lives in one of many small native communities, reliant instead on nature and the environment, and with a polar opposite view of man and his surroundings. This heralds the start of an adventure for the younger of the two that leads to a whole new world of advanced technology, unexpected friendships, violence, some explicit sex, romance, and indeed love, all intertwined with the ultimate goal of a return to his own people. There is a good introduction and preface to the book, giving a comprehensive outline of how the world came to be the way it is, eliminating the need for too much contrived dialogue to convey the same information in the body of the book, relying instead on passing comments and throw away references to fill in the gaps. Action and dialogue are very well balanced and equally convincing, continually adding to ad driving the story forward. An added bonus, and totally in keeping with a Sci-Fi theme there is an accompanying website link to the book, the author’s own wordpress blog, giving lots of additional background and explanatory information to the world and technology in which events take place.

Although a Sci-fi novel, this isn’t what I would call ‘hard’ sci-fi in the sense of an Asimov or Arthur C. Clarke novel; it doesn’t entirely rely on immersing the reader in far flung advanced technology or totally alien concepts, concentrating instead on developing the characters and what they’re doing, giving the book a real depth to it. The time period being set in the relative near future ensures that the technology and science, although highly advanced and with a definite sci-fi feel to it, are still very much rooted in the science of today thereby giving the book an added authenticity. Some of the themes will be familiar to sci-fi fans, namely the Dystopian concept of an enclosed technology based society surrounded by a less (technologically) advanced native population and the almost paranoid and obsessive monitoring and control of its citizens, having already been explored in both print and on screen – there are definite echoes of Brave New world, Shape of Things to Come, Nineteen Eighty Four, and Logan’s Run to name but a few, but the author treats these concepts with an original approach and with the added hindsight of current advancements and the potential of the emerging technologies of today.

I did feel however that the period in which the novel s set, i.e. circa 2060, was a tad too early considering where we’re at in society today and the immense engineering challenges the new world in habitants would have faced, not to mention the time it would have taken for society to recover from its original collapse. There were a couple of very minor typos and grammatical issues that might well have been picked up by one last line by line edit but certainly not so much of an issue to diminish my enjoyment or my 5 star rating. Overall though, this was a totally believable Dystopian sci-fi story, exceptionally well researched in relation to the native culture and background of the ‘outlanders,’ as well as the financial machinations that might well yet lead to the sort of collapse as befell the society of the book. The story is well concluded, providing a comprehensive round up of events, as well as a brief glimpse beyond – and best of all, the conclusion begs for a sequel, which I will surely be reading when it comes out. Great book!

 

Author & Journalist, Ian Probert – Guest Blog

 

Guardian picFor my first ever guest blog I’m featuring the very talented author Ian Probert. His latest book Johnny Nothing has drawn considerable praise and is available to purchase on Amazon and other outlets at the links below. In addition to being an internationally successful author, Ian Probert is also a highly respected journalist. Ian’s guest blog here is divided into two parts: In the first part we read of the time he met Muhammad Ali, and his astonishment when the The Greatest quite unexpectedly kissed his then girlfriend. In Part two he moves onto a feature on his latest book Johnny Nothing

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When The Greatest kissed my girl

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It was the third time I’d met him. Well, that’s not strictly true. In reality I’d only met him once before. Met, in the sense of shaking his hand and getting introduced to him. Met, in the sense that he’d spoken to me and I’d actually sat at the dinner table and eaten with him (with a lot of other journalists it has to be said). The second time didn’t really count as a ‘meet’. On that occasion I’d queued at Sports Pages in London along with hundreds of other people hoping to bask in his presence. But then basking in the presence of Muhammad Ali – once the most famous person on planet Earth and arguably the finest boxer ever to lace up the gloves – was usually more than most people could ever hope for.

The year was 1994 and I was standing in the queue outside the Whiteley’s branch of Waterstones waiting for that third meeting. Beside me was my then partner, a good-looking French lawyer named Julie. Behind me was Hugh McIlvaney, the great Scottish sportswriter who had been there to report on some of Ali’s greatest triumphs, not least of which his victory over George Foreman in Zaire in 1974. McIlvaney, despite a career spent travelling the world and meeting and writing about some of sport’s greatest icons, was happy to wait his turn alongside Ali’s fans.

It must have been Ali’s 10-millionth book signing and he was having trouble drumming up any enthusiasm for the occasion. More than that he looked ill. He was hunched over a desk in the middle of the shop, scrawling signature after signature while admirers attempted to catch his attention. ‘You’re the greatest fighter that ever lived,’ most of them said in so many words, and Ali would move his head slowly toward them and nod weakly in agreement. Speech for him seemed impossible. The thousands of punches that Ali took in his career had turned boxing’s finest exponent into its most tragic indictment.

Holding Julie’s hand, the front of the queue grew closer and I found myself not looking forward to what was about to happen. After all, what was to be gained? The Ali whom I loved was the person on TV who danced the shuffle and seemed to defy any logic as he charmed his way through a quite dazzling boxing career. The person sitting before me wasn’t really Ali. He was someone else. He bore no resemblance to the beautiful man who once cradled the planet in his hands.

Now it was our turn. The two of us approached the table nervously. Neither one of really wanted to shove the book we had just bought in front of the great man. But we did. We did because there was nothing else to do. Ali signed his name and passed the book to us. Then – and I don’t really know why I did this – I asked if I could take a picture of him with Julie. Ali looked tired and I immediately felt guilty about asking the question.

Then something remarkable happened.

Ali1Ali slowly rose to his feet. It was painful to observe as the former champion straightened his body and shuffled toward us. Except this was no Ali Shuffle. It was the painful gait of an old man. A large part of me was desperate to look away. Before I could do so, however, Ali climbed on to his toes. Unbelievably, he began to skip and as he did so the years slipped away from him like autumn leaves in the breeze. He threw a few punches into the air and all at once he was the young Cassius Clay, the man who shocked the world by beating Sonny Liston; the man who took on and defeated the parole board.

As we stood there open mouthed, Ali seized the moment and moved over to Julie. Suddenly his arms were around her and he was kissing her. And the kiss was not a peck. The kiss lasted far longer than it should have done. But I was not disturbed by the sight of another man kissing my girlfriend. I was too busy photographing that very long moment.

And then it was over and Ali was back slumped into his seat. Suddenly forty years older. And Julie was looking back at me in shock, her face drained of blood, her lungs of air. My girlfriend had just been passionately kissed by Muhammad Ali! It was only when we got home that Julie confessed that she hadn’t a clue who Muhammad Ali was.

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Johnny Nothing

Johnny_Nothing Cover

 

BLURB

“Great new kids book alert! My two are in hysterics reading Johnny Nothing by Ian Probert (and I am too).” Jane Bruton, Editor of Grazia

“Oh, Wow! Dark, sordid, grotesque and hilarious are only a few words I can conjure up to describe this hilarious book.” Lizzie Baldwin, mylittlebookblog

Critics are comparing Ian Probert to Roald Dahl. And Johnny Nothing we have a modern successor to Charlie And The Chocolate Factory.

Johnny Nothing is best-selling author Ian Probert’s first ever children’s book – although adults are enjoying it too. The story of the poorest boy in the world and the nastiest mother in the universe, the book is earning rave reviews. Children and grown-ups are all laughing at this incredibly funny kids book.

Take a look for yourself:

 

http://geni.us/3oR8

To celebrate the paperback launch of Johnny Nothing we are offering a free Kindle copy of the book to the first 100 people who Tweet the following message:

@truth42 I’m reading Johnny Nothing by Ian Probert. http://geni.us/3oR8 #YA #Kindle #kidsbooks

The first ten readers who answer the following question will also receive a signed print of one of the book’s illustrations.

Q: What is the tattoo on Ben’s arm?

Send your answers to truth42@icloud.com

 

Links

Amazon http://geni.us/3oR8

iBooks https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/johnny-nothing/id908777441?mt=11

Book promo http://youtu.be/xaWO4tR4oj0?list=UUzLRcpNMLRKKtJhes1s1C7w

WordPress http://ianprobertbooks.wordpress.com

Website http://ianprobert.com

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/groups/716683635030173/

Twitter @truth42 https://twitter.com/truth42

 

Author biography

Ian Probert has been scribbling down words ever since he learned to spell the phrase: ‘Once upon a time…’. He is the author of Internet Spy, Rope Burns and a bunch of other titles. Internet Spy was a bestseller in the US and made into a TV film. Rope Burns is a book about why books shouldn’t be written about boxing. Ian has also written things for a shed load of newspapers and magazines. When Ian was a student he used to write lots of letters to the bank manager.

 

EXCERPT

Bill had a shaven head and was wearing a blue tracksuit. He was almost seven feet tall and built like an outdoor toilet made of brick. Bill didn’t realise this but he was a distant descendent of Neanderthal Man. He had only one eyebrow – one long bushy eyebrow that reached right across his forehead. He looked like what you might get if you force fed a member of Oasis with a half-tonne black plastic sackful of steroids.

And if you were brave enough to be present when he took off his tracksuit you would discover that his back was so covered in hair that he was able part it with a comb. If Bill had had more of an interest in fashion, he might even have considered giving it a curly perm and perhaps a few extensions

29 Bill_BenOn his right arm, Bill had a tattoo which simply read ‘Bill’. This was in case he woke up one morning and forgot who he was. This was actually less unlikely than you might imagine because standing next to him was his twin brother. His name was Ben and he was identical to Bill in every way except that the tattoo on his arm read ‘Bin’ (the tattooist was either South African or not a very good speller). He was wearing a red tracksuit.

Bill gave Mr. and Mrs. MacKenzie the tiniest of smiles and managed to grunt ‘hello’. Ben gave the couple exactly the same tiniest of smiles and also managed to grunt ‘hello’.

13d JohnnyThe two men were standing protectively close to Johnny. They were so large that in the confines of Johnny’s bedroom they looked like giants, which they were. They were so enormous that each of them had their own postcode. They were so gigantic that they had their passport photos taken by satellite. They were so humungous that you could spend all day thinking up rubbishy jokes about how big they were and never adequately describe just how indescribably, earth-shatteringly ENORMOUS they were. By no stretch of the imagination could you call them small (unless, of course, you were a lot bigger than them).

The pair of Goliaths were having to stoop slightly so as to avoid head-butting the ceiling, which actually even looked a little scared itself. They were a terrifying sight. Even scarier than a school trip to a Weight-Watcher’s nudist camp.

There was a long, pregnant silence in the room like this:

This eventually gave birth to an even longer post-natal silence, which, in the interest of preserving the rain forests or the battery on your Kindle, I shan’t demonstrate.

The four grown-ups eyed each other nervously. Bill and Ben looked at the Mackenzies like they were looking at insects that could be squashed into pulpy insect juice any time they so desired.

The Mackenzies looked at Bill and Ben like they were looking at two giant skinhead Neanderthal bully boys who had just appeared from nowhere in their recently and unexpectedly decorated council flat.

Johnny looked a little scared.

Finally Billy Mackenzie managed to get his mouth working a little and spluttered: ‘Who are you?’ And then: ‘What do you want?’

There was another long silence – let’s call it a pause – while Bill and Ben looked at each other as if trying to decide who was going to answer. Finally Bill spoke: ‘You the boy’s parents?’ he demanded in a voice that sounded like an angry rhino with horn-ache. Although if he was clever enough he would have realised that this was a rhetorical question.

There was yet another long silence (you’ll be relieved to hear that this is the last silence you’re going to get in this chapter) before Billy Mackenzie mumbled ‘Yes’.

‘We’re Johnny’s bodyguards,’ continued Bill. ‘We’re here to make sure that everything’s hunky dory.’

‘Hunky dory?’ Mrs. Mackenzie suddenly found her voice. ‘What do you mean ‘hunky dory”?’

Now Ben spoke: ‘What my brother means to say,’ he explained. ‘Is that we’ve been – how shall I say – contracted – to make sure that this young feller’s affairs are in order.’

‘Get out of my house!’ interrupted Mrs. Mackenzie, suddenly feeling a little braver, although she had no idea why.

Bill and Ben looked at each again for a moment. They did this almost as much as your mum looks in the mirror. Or you dad looks at websites that he shouldn’t be looking at. ‘First of all,’ said Bill, ‘This isn’t a house – it’s a flat.’

‘And second of all,’ said his brother. ‘We ain’t going nowhere. And neither are you.’

‘Johnny who are these men?’ Mrs. MacKenzie asked her son, ignoring the two giants.

‘I’m sorry mum but…’ Johnny started to speak but Bill cut in like a pair of scissors that chops sentences into bits.

‘…What the young feller means to say is that the fun’s over.’

‘The fun’s over?’ repeated Felicity MacKenzie numbly.

‘That’s right,’ continued Ben. ‘You’ve had a right old time. You’ve been spending his money like it’s your own. You’ve been ripping the poor young feller off. And we’re here to put a stop to it. From now on things are gonna be different.’

‘I’ve had enough of this,’ said Mrs. MacKenzie. ‘Nobody speaks to me like this in my house…’

‘Flat,’ corrected Ben.

‘Nobody speaks to me like this in my flat. Billy, call the police!’

As usual Billy MacKenzie did as he was told. He reached into his pocket for his mobile phone. Before he had the chance to even turn it on the gigantic frame of Bill was towering over him.

‘That an iPhone?’ asked Ben.

‘Erm… Yes,’ said Billy, who could only watch as the huge man took it from him and with one hand crushed it into a chunk of buckled metal and shattered touch screen.

‘I think it’s broken,’ said Ben. ‘You ought to take it back to the Apple store. Tell ‘em that you’re not getting a decent signal.’

‘Right!’ cried Mrs. MacKenzie. ‘We’re leaving! You’ll be very sorry you did that. I’ll fetch the police myself!’

Now the giant frame of Bill was standing in front of her. He was holding something in his hand that looked a little like a child’s toy space gun.

‘Know what this is?’ he asked. Although once again he wasn’t clever enough to recognise that this was a rhetorical question.

Mrs. Mackenzie regarded the object for a moment. Then she shook her head. Whatever it was she guessed that it was not intended to provide pleasure, happiness or fulfilment. Anything that has a trigger and a barrel and goes ‘bang!’ seldom does.

‘Come on Billy!’ she said. ‘We’re leaving!’

Bill stood in front of her blocking the doorway. ‘Not so fast,’ he said, not so slowly. ‘It’s called a Taser. See this little trigger at the front? If I press this it’ll give you a small electric shock. It won’t hurt you…Well not too much anyway.’

Bill raised the object and gently touched Mrs. MacKenzie on the arm. There was a loudish bang and a flash of blue neon light and Mrs. MacKenzie collapsed groaning to the floor. She was conscious but wasn’t able to move her arms and legs

‘Oh my gawd!’ said Billy Mackenzie bravely charging out of the room in terror. He got as far as the stairs before there was a second flash. He, too, crumpled to the floor. Bill dragged him back into the bedroom by the scruff of his neck.

03b  JohnnyJohnny Nothing got to his feet and stood over his two parents. He looked anxious. ‘Are they… Are they… OK?’ he gasped.

‘Don’t you worry yourself,’ smiled Ben. ‘Give em a few minutes and they’ll be right as rain.’

‘But they’ll think twice before they try to run off again,’ said his brother.

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04a Uncle Marley 06a Organist 07 Vicar 12c Felicity 14 Kiss copy 36 Reporter 33 Tramp 32 God

 

Hawaiian Lei of Shrunken Heads – Book Review

katerina1This is a book that came to my attention via my IndieAuthorReviewExchange Fb group. The author, Katerina Sestakova Novotna, was born and raised in the Czech Republic. She lived in New York where she went to college. Currently she is living in Hawaii. She holds a Masters in Philosophy; her specialties are ethics and comparative philosophy. She has written numerous essays on those subjects. Her first collection of short stories “Hawaiian Lei of Shrunken Heads” is the subject of the following book review.
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Hawaiian Lei of Shrunken Heads, by Katerina Sestakova Novotna
(Available from Amazon in eBook format)

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This debut collection of short stories is the absolute epitome of originality and dark imagination; although there are only five stories here, it’s important to note that they are somewhat longer than the average short story, placing them almost in the mini novella category. Set on the island of Hawaii each story gives the reader an insight into the mythology and traditions of the indigenous population there, mixing it up with all the darker elements of psychology, comparative religion, and vengeful gods, along with the all too human traits and motivations of its modern day characters.

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Among these stories there are tales of human and animal sacrifice, the bigotry and bitterness of an old war veteran, the untimely end of foreign prostitute, and the equally strange and horrific conclusion to another foreigner’s stay in Hawaii. Some of the stories are written as a narrative, cleverly imparting information about Hawaiian folklore whilst still driving each story forward. Although each of these stories might well be described as dark with a touch of psychological and mythical horror about them, each one is unique in its presentation and theme, but with the common thread of Hawaiian culture and folklore as the vehicle for each tale. There is some mention in one of the early stories of there being no written text of Hawaiian beliefs as there is for Christianity or Judaism, but rather an oral tradition of such beliefs being passed down from generation to generation; the narrative style is in each case perfectly in keeping with this oral tradition, reading very much as you might imagine a tribal elder telling of the ancient stories and myths to an eager young audience, and in this respect the narrative style works extremely well. In others though, the author switches to very convincing and well written and sometimes explicit dialogue to advance the story, and amid the esoteric names and language associated with Hawaiian culture, the author maintains an authentic credibility with her use of some modern terminology and reference to some of the darker sides of modern culture..

These five stories were highly original and imaginative in the way they used island folklore as the framework for them, yet cleverly interwoven into present day themes and settings, they achieved a real believability that is sometimes missing in similarly themed stories. I would have liked a more definitive ending to some though as I did think in a couple of the stories, the endings were a little too open ended, leaving a tad too many unanswered questions, but overall these were five extremely entertaining and well written stories, well researched, and due to their longer lengths than the average short story, were able to really engage me in a way that that I find quite rare with short story collections. Highly recommended!

A Reader of Reviews of your Own Books: To be or not to be?

echoesofthepen:

Had forgotten about this great response i had to one of my reviews awhile… Just as an author appreciates a review of their book/s, reviewers also appreciate the occasional response too… Thanks Andy

Originally posted on Andrew Updegrove: Tales of Adversego:

Scales 120All authors can be divided into three categories: those who read reviews of their books, those who don’t, and those that do and claim they don’t. It would be fair to say that all authors can also be divided into those that are successful enough to ignore reviews, and, well, all the others (like me).

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Nature’s Gold – Poetry Review

Penny Luker is the author of ‘The Mermaid’ a book of short stories and two other children’s books, among others. She also writes for the e-zine ‘All Things Girl,’ http://www.allthingsgirl.com.

Further links to her writing can be found at:

http://www.pennyluker.wordpress.com
http://www.penspoems.wordpress.com

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Nature’s Gold, by Penny Luker

(Available from Amazon in both Ebook & Print format)

Penny1This is a lovely collection of short well constructed poems covering a variety of themes: betrayal, satire, humour, domestic abuse, getting old, and first love to name but a few. From the betrayal of a wife as she notices the smell of perfume on here husbands shirt to the hard-hitting satire on fox hunting, the author treats her topics with a gentle yet poignant tone.
Amid the joy and sadness of these poems, there are several varied reflections of life, such as being flattered at the hairdressers, but remembering not to give away too many secrets, and then on a more serious note the injustice of how different the lives of children can be depending where they are born, and back again to a more humorous tone, exploring the joys of being a grandparent (though I won’t spoil the ending to that one). I particularly enjoyed some of the more uplifting poems too, such as one about a young man finally getting the opportunity to flee the nest and the birth of a new baby. The author also makes good use of contrast and comparison within each poem when appropriate, especially so in Blue Planet and The Demise of the Country Fox.
Stylistically these are more of a prose style than the traditional rhyming verse, though the author does combine the two most effectively I would say. Most of the poems here tell a story, but again there are several more abstract verses that allow the reader’s thoughts to wander, reflect, and interpret according to their own memories and experience. A delightful collection I shall no doubt be rereading from time to time…

Further works by Penny Luker: click thumbnails for Amazon links..

penny3 penny1 penny2 penny2

Second Chance – Book Review

Second Chance is the first of the Transcendence Trilogy – Book 1. I had been meaning to read and review this book quite some months ago but for various reasons my reading schedule was interrupted. Thankfully though, my blogging, writing, and reviewing schedules are now slowly returning to something approaching normal service, which is just as well as I shall now be adding Absent Souls, the second book of the trilogy, to my ever-lengthening reading list.

Second Chance by Dylan Hearn is a book I discovered via a reblog by Graeme Cummings (author of Ravens Gathering) of an excellent article by Dylan Hearn on mutual support among Indie and self-published authors. As well as being an author, Dylan Hearn writes and maintains a blog that is a wealth of information to any new or aspiring writer, particularly self-published ones. For further information and links to Dylan Hearn please see:

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. https://authordylanhearn.wordpress.com/

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https://twitter.com/HearnDylan

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Second Chance,

(The Transcendence Trilogy – Book 1)

By Dylan Hearn

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(Available from Amazon in both Ebook and print formats… click on cover pic for further details)

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Dylanhearn1This is a book I discovered via the world of blogging and occasional mentions on various other social media. Set in a near dystopian future this is a multi-stranded thriller that combines elements of science fiction with political intrigue, abduction and murder, all set against the murky backdrop of big business and globalisation. Mixed in amongst the plot we have a pretty young researcher who has gone missing, a newly elected politician trying to make a difference to the world she lives in, and some highly sensitive research into cloning and life extension, all playing a part in a world that is post major political and climatic upheaval. What makes this book especially believable is that much of the technology and the political landscape can all be seen in the world we live in today, albeit in embryonic form: Google’s driverless cars and data glasses, online polling, attempts to connect the entire world via the internet, speculation about both the climate and political consequences of global warming… all these factors are more developed in the book, but clearly have their origins in the present.

There is a lot going on this book, and it would be easy for the reader to get confused were it not for the author’s clever writing style and technique; the book is divided into three parts with over fifty well defined chapters. Rather than trying to combine all the elements of the book in one go, different characters and elements are introduced in separate chapters. The story and part each character plays is told via these different chapters but with sufficient overlap and reference to the others to bring the story together as a whole thus making an otherwise complex plot surprisingly readable and easy to follow.

The dialogue is sharp and crisp, and used to good effect to bring out the character traits of the protagonists and to drive the story forward. I must admit it took me a couple of chapters to get a grip of the way the story was going but that’s nothing unusual in a book of this complexity. Throughout the book there are hints and references to the events and circumstances which led to the world in which the book is set but very little specific detail, and I think more attention to that aspect would have given the book and the characters a greater depth. I would also have liked a stronger epilogue tying up some of the loose ends but with two more books to follow it’s quite possible we’ll be learning a lot more of that in the future.

Overall, this a thoroughly believable glimpse into a very possible future that might well be nearer than we realise. This was a fascinating and entertaining read that pushed all the right buttons for me, and I shall certainly be reading and reviewing book two of this trilogy.

Click on cover pic for link to book two in this trilogy:

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Make this an Indie Author Holiday Season

echoesofthepen:

Many thanks for the mention and recommendation. Not all the member’s books are listed yet, although many of the very best are, with more being listed each day as I become aware of them. Thanks Andy…

Originally posted on Andrew Updegrove: Tales of Adversego:

Bookshelves 130If you’re part of a family that loves books, here’s a suggestion for how to do good while doing well this holiday season: spend a mere $10 on an Amazon gift card and tuck it in an envelope along with this web address: http://indieauthorreviewexchange.com/

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Roly Poly Monster & Roly Poly Monster goes to the Zoo – Children’s Book Reviews

I first discovered this author and her books when she joined my indieauthorreview exchange Fb group. Charity Tober has been writing and creating stories for as long as she can remember. She published her first children’s picture book Roly-Poly Monster in 2013 and followed up with Roly-Poly Monster Goes to the Zoo in 2014.

She collaborated on both books with her husband and illustrator Andrew Tober. She based the personality of Roly-Poly Monster after her young son and how he views the world with a sense of wonder and excitement, seeing the fun in every situation. Charity Tober, along with her husband and son, currently resides in Lake Mary, Florida.

Check out the Roly-Poly Monster website at http://www.rolypolymonster.com

“Like” the Roly-Poly Monster Facebook page to get the latest updates: http://www.facebook.com/rolypolymonster

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Roly Poly Monster, by Charity Tober

(Available from Amazon in both print and eBook formats)

charity1A charming little book for young children. I read this with my 4 year old grandson, and a fun time was had by all. The dialogue and vocabulary is deliberately kept simple for the younger end of the children’s market but the nature of the writing makes it easy for the reader to improvise and expand on depending on the level of development and vocabulary of the child they’re reading to. Much of the story is interspaced with some some clever and fun rhyming. This isn’t a demanding story or one that will overstretch the younger child’s attention span, but one that will still no doubt thoroughly entertain – a delightful account of a fun day out at the park that any young child will immediately relate to, an absolutely perfect bedtime story for any toddler or young child. The illustrations are also very good, and again, perfectly catered to the younger child. With this is in mind, this is one of those occasions when if reading to a youngster on some sort of electronic device, I’d recommend a tablet of some sort as opposed to a regular Kindle in order to best appreciate the colourful and vibrant illustrations. This is a story that can be read and re-read many times should the reader should the reader want to improvise and add their own input each time. A truly delightful children’s book!

Roly Poly Monster Goes To The Zoo, by Charity Tober
(Available from Amazon in both print and eBook formats)

charity2Just like the author’s previous book, Roly Poly Monster, this is another charming little book for young children, and one that again enthralled my 4 year old grandson. Again, nice simple and appropriate dialogue for a young child. The fun style of writing and rhyming particularly amused my grandson:

“Something fun to do… Going to the zoo…”

Once again the reader is treated to another fun day out that any youngster will immediately relate to, this time a fun trip to the zoo to see all the exciting animals. This is a story that will ignite a child’s imagination with its bright and vibrant illustrations, talk of ice cream and picnics and having fun, not to mention Roly Poly Monster, the fun and friendly monster star of the story. Another great addition to what I hope will be an ongoing series of such books.

Darkly Wood – Book Review

This was another recommendation from friend and fellow blogger and author, Lesley Hayes. Darkly Wood, by Max Power is definitely one of those books I can see going on to do extremely well in the future, just as I’m sure his latest new book, Larry Flynn, will also be a success. Without a doubt this is one of my top picks for 2014.

As well being an author, Max Power is a prolific contributor to the Indie Author Review Exchange Fb group. Further information on Max Power and links to his writing can be found at his blog:

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http://maxpowerbooks.wordpress.com/

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Darkly Wood

By Max Power (available in eBook format from Amazon)

 

MP1This is a book that embodies horror, romance, and the paranormal in a way I’ve rarely seen. With a good opening narrative, right from the start the author conjures up an atmospheric sense of creepiness and the macabre reminiscent of a latter day Edgar Allan Poe or Dennis Wheatley, so much so that one can almost imagine Christopher Lee or Vincent Price playing the part of one of the characters, particularly that of Lord Terrance Darkly.

Initially we learn of the mystery and horror of Darkly Wood by way of the central character, Daisy May Coppertop, reading through a copy of a book of tales about Darkly Wood – a book within a book so to speak but at that point that’s all they are, just stories, but certainly nothing to be alarmed about, at least not yet.

What starts off as Daisy and Benjamin, intrigued by the apparent sight of strange looking boy in the distance, taking a seemingly innocent and pleasant walk along the edge of a nearby woodland soon turns into a a dark and fear filled battle not just to escape its clutches but simply to survive. Faced with ever increasing danger and a sense of time running out for them, the bond between Daisy, and Benjamin, her new found friend from the local village, grows into something much more than simple friendship or first love.

The writing technique is both clever and imaginative, using descriptive narrative to set the tone and atmosphere early on, using the opportunity to inform the reader of many nuggets of information that come into play later in the book, gradually introducing just the right balance of dialogue and action. The numerous but short chapters make for a very readable style of writing, and by way of the different tales of the book within the book, the author keeps the story alive and fresh throughout. In books such as this the author often requires the reader’s implicit consent to suspend their disbelief, but here the reader is left in no doubt whatsoever as to the mystery and horror of the wood; in one of the chapters the author cleverly demonstrates the ‘other worldliness’ of the wood when in one particular tale, someone trying to find their way out of the wood tries using their field craft skills to escape only to find all the laws of nature and physics don’t seem to apply in the heart of Darkly Wood. As the story progresses the seemingly unrelated tales of the wood draw closer to form an intricate pattern; surprises and shocks keep the reader entranced, drawing you in just as Daisy and Benjamin are drawn further and further into Darkly Wood. Filled with twists and turns and and new revelations at every juncture, an amazing and diverse array of characters, and a conclusion as eerie and unexpected as any pone could imagine, this is definitely one of my favourite reads of 2014.

 

Link to Max Power’s latest book:

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